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Updates on 17/01/2014

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

Under the sub-heading 'Booster doses', the second paragraph (page 195) should read as follows:

Children aged >15 months and up to 59 months of age at presentation who have not received a primary course of a Hib or Hib-containing vaccine will only require 1 dose of vaccine as catch-up, irrespective of the number of previous doses administered. There should be a minimum 2-month interval between their last dose and the catch-up dose. Catch-up for Hib vaccination for children up to 59 months of age is outlined in Table 2.1.8 Catch-up schedule for Hib vaccination for children <5 years of age in 2.1.5 Catch-up.

Hepatitis B

4.5.7 Recommendations

Under the sub-heading 'Persons at occupational risk', the first paragraph (page 223) should read as follows:

The risk to persons in certain occupations differs considerably from setting to setting in different parts of Australia. However, it is recommended that all staff directly involved in patient care and/or the handling of human tissue, blood or body fluids should be vaccinated. In addition, standard precautions against exposure to human tissue, blood or body fluids should be used as a matter of routine.71

Under the sub-heading 'Persons at occupational risk', the first bullet point (page 223) should read as follows:

  • police, members of the armed forces, emergency services staff and staff of correctional facilities; these persons should be vaccinated if they are assigned to duties that may involve exposure to human tissue, blood or body fluids

Under the sub-heading 'Serological testing following hepatitis B vaccination' the first bullet point (page 225) should read as follows:

  • those at significant occupational risk (e.g. healthcare workers whose work involves frequent exposure to human tissue, blood or body fluids)

4.5.11 Public health management of hepatitis B

In Table 4.5.3: Post-exposure prophylaxis for non-immune persons exposed to a HbsAg-positive source, in the Perinatal exposure row, text in the Vaccine (right hand) column (page 229) should read as follows:

Type of exposure

Hepatitis B immunoglobulin

Vaccine

Perinatal (exposure of babies during and after birth)*

100 IU, by IM injection

Single dose immediately after birth (preferably within 12 hours of birth and certainly within 48 hours)

0.5 mL, by IM injection

Immediately after birth (preferably within 24 hours, no later than 7 days), then at 2, 4 and 6 months of age

Measles

4.9.7 Recommendations

Under the sub-heading 'Infants aged <12 months', the second paragraph (page 272) should read as follows:

Two doses of measles-containing vaccine should be administered at ≥12 months of age (see ‘Children’ below). This is because maternal antibodies to measles are known to persist in many infants until approximately 11 months of age and may interfere with active immunisation before 12 months of age.2 However, there is some evidence that a dose provided at ≥11 months (but prior to 12 months) of age is sufficiently immunogenic; as such, doses given in this timeframe may not need to be repeated in all circumstances (see also Table 2.1.5 Minimum acceptable age for the 1st dose of scheduled vaccines in infants in special circumstances).

Under the sub-heading 'Children', the fifth paragraph (page 272) should read as follows:

If MMRV vaccine is inadvertently administered as dose 1 of MMR–containing vaccine, the dose does not need to be repeated (providing it was given at ≥12 months of age; see Table 2.1.5 Minimum acceptable age for the 1st dose of scheduled vaccines in infants in special circumstances). However, parents/carers should be advised regarding the small but increased risk of fever and febrile seizures (compared with that expected following MMR vaccine).

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Pneumococcal disease

4.13.6 Dosage and administration

The fourth paragraph under this heading (page 323) should read as follows:

13vPCV (Prevenar 13) is registered for use in infants and children aged 6 weeks up to 17 years and adults aged ≥50 years.

4.13.12 Variations from product information

The second paragraph under this heading (page 336) should read as follows:

13vPCV is registered for use in children up to 17 years of age and adults aged ≥50 years. The ATAGI recommends a dose of 13vPCV for adults of any age who have a condition(s) associated with the highest risk of IPD (see List 4.13.1, Category A). This is based on the likely benefit outweighing uncertainties and risks, and on immunogenicity and safety data in children.

Rotavirus

4.17.11 Adverse events

Under the sub-heading 'Intussusception', the sentence beginning 'The increased risk of IS...' in the first paragraph (page 382) should read as follows:

The increased risk of IS following rotavirus vaccination, from the most recent Australian study, is estimated as approximately 6 additional cases of intussusception among every 100 000 infants vaccinated, or 14 additional cases per year in Australia.74

References

Reference 74 has been updated to:

Carlin JB, Macartney KK, Lee KJ, et al. Intussusception risk and disease prevention associated with rotavirus vaccines in Australia’s national immunization program. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2013;57:1427-34.

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