We are building this new website to better deliver information. Find out more. We are building this new website to better deliver information. Find out more.
Let us know what you think.

Vaccination for people who are immunocompromised

People who are immunocompromised may need extra doses of some vaccines to optimise protection. Some vaccines are contraindicated in these people.

People who are immunocompromised have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality from many vaccine-preventable diseases. 

A person can be immunocompromised as a result of: 

  • congenital or acquired disorders
  • disease 
  • immunosuppressive medical treatment 

All people who are immunocompromised, or people who may be immunocompromised in the future as a result of disease or treatment, need to have a thorough risk assessment to determine their level of immuncompromise.

People who are immunocompromised need their vaccination history assessed carefully and a plan for future vaccination made. Live vaccines may be contraindicated in these people, or the person may need extra doses of inactivated vaccines to protect against disease.

See Infographic. Vaccination for people who are immunocompromised.

Page history

Date added: 
9 June 2018
Last updated: 
8 June 2018
Last reviewed: 
8 June 2018
Previous

Vaccination for migrants, refugees and people seeking asylum in Australia

Next

Vaccination for women who are planning pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding

Definitions

BCG
bacille Calmette-Guérin
MMR
measles-mumps-rubella
MMRV
measles-mumps-rubella-varicella
SCID
severe combined immunodeficiency
13vPCV
13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine
23vPPV
23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine
DTPa
diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine
IPV
inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine
dT
diphtheria-tetanus vaccine for use in adults
dTpa
diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, reduced antigen content formulation
HSCT
haematopoietic stem cell transplant
GVHD
graft-versus-host disease
IPD
invasive pneumococcal disease
WA
Western Australia
GBS
Guillain-Barré syndrome
SC
subcutaneous
JE
Japanese encephalitis
PT
pertussis toxoid
WHO
World Health Organization
AIDS
acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
IM
intramuscular